Baked Salmon with Southeast Asian Marinade

In honor of Heart Association month, we found that delicious and healthy recipe from mayoclinic.com for baked salmon. Not only is this great for your heart, it would please your mouth buds as well!

Serves: 2

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup pineapple juice
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 teaspoon low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 2 salmon fillets, each 4 ounces
  • 1/4 teaspoon sesame oil
  • Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1 cup diced fresh fruit, such as pineapple, mango and papaya

Directions:

  1. In a small bowl, add the pineapple juice, garlic, soy sauce and ginger. Stir to mix evenly.
  2. Arrange the salmon fillets in a small baking dish. Pour the pineapple juice mixture over the top. Put in the refrigerator and marinate for 1 hour. Turn the salmon periodically as needed.
  3. Preheat the oven to 375 F. Lightly coat 2 squares of aluminum foil with cooking spray. Place the marinated salmon fillets on the aluminum foil. Drizzle each with 1/8 teaspoon sesame oil. Sprinkle with pepper and top each with 1/2 cup diced fruit.
  4. Wrap the foil around the salmon, folding the edges down to seal. Bake until the fish is opaque throughout when tested with the tip of a knife, about 10 minutes on each side. Transfer the salmon to warmed individual plates and serve immediately.

What other recipes do you have?

Click here for the original recipe and nutrition info—courtesy of http://www.mayoclinic.com

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Eat These Foods for Healthier Teeth

The Huffington Post wrote a great article on what to eat to gain healthier teeth. The reason for the plaque buildup in your mouth is due to the starchy or sugary food that you eat or drink. The sugars or starch mixes with the plaque which creates acid in your teeth, breaking down the hard enamel on the surface resulting in tooth decay.

A solid rule is to avoid any kinds of food that has sugar, acid and stickiness such as the popular candies: Starburst and Skittles. The article also shows some top foods proven to protect your pearly whites in research or clinical practices.

1. Cheese—Cheese is a great choice, because it is low in sugar and acid and high in calcium. Another ingredient it has is casein which is a protein that is found in milk and it helps fortify the tooth’s surface helping to resist cavities.

2. Sugar-free gum—this favorite food to chew on usually contains Xylitol. It is the sugar replacement in gum and it helps prevent “harmful bacteria in plaque from metabolizing sugar that generates, thus generating harmful acids that degrade tooth enamel.”

3. Raw Veggies (especially celery)—Fresh vegetables are good for your teeth, because they require you to chew, creating lots and lots of salvia! Celery in particular is pointed out, because it breaks down into tiny tough strands that naturally clean your teeth.

4. Yogurt—another contender that has casein!

Click here for the original article and more foods—courtesy of Huffingtonpost.com

So what do you do to help protect your teeth?

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Health Boosting Chocolates are on the Rise

So far most Americans know that dark chocolate has more health benefits than milk chocolate, but imagine chocolate with other health-boosting compounds to help prevent against heart disease, cancer and stroke. The markets for these kinds of chocolates are increasing 10% each year. It is now making annual sales of $600 million a year which is only a small percentage of the functional food industry—products marketed as having health benefits—which totals an estimated $20-30 billion a year.

Chocolatiers over the past several years have been creating different kind of chocolates that can help increase stamina, sharpen cognitive skills, and boost the immune system.  They have been doing this by adding a range of super-foods, supplements and spices to their recipes. For example, Antidote Chocolates based in New York have ingredients such as fennel to help with digestion and juniper berries to reduce water retention.

However, nutritionists say that overall dark chocolate must be dark in order to be healthy and that any chocolate containing less than 70% cacao will “offer few benefits and little functionality.” Also remember that chocolates can be full of fat, calories, and sugar so any health benefits can be offset by this. Be sure to read the ingredients and ask questions before purchasing.

Would you be ordering any of these “super” chocolates soon?

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Read original article here—courtesy of Times Healthland.

Top Sources of Salt in Your Food

A new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found the top 10 sources of sodium in the American diet. It is already stated that nearly 90% of all Americans eat too much salt, which increase chances of developing hypertension leading to heart disease and stroke. The average daily sodium intake was 3,266 mg a day for an American which is far exceeding the government’s recommendation of 2,300 mg.

Overall the study found 10 foods that make up 44% of all the sodium we eat.

  1. Bread and rolls, 7.4%
  2. Cold cuts/cured meats, 5.1%
  3. Pizza, 4.9%
  4. Fresh and processed poultry, 4.5%
  5. Soups, 4.3%
  6. Sandwiches like cheeseburgers, 4%
  7. Cheese, 3.8%
  8. Pasta dishes like spaghetti with meat sauce, 3.3%
  9. Meat dishes like meatloaf with tomato sauce, 3.2%
  10. Snacks, including chips, pretzels, popcorn and puffs, 3.1%

It might seem odd that snacks like popcorn and chips are listed as #10 and bread and rolls are listed #1, it is because the study accounted how often Americans would eat these type of food. It is surveyed that Americans are more likely to eat bread and rolls in their daily diet bringing them to the number one spot. It does not necessary mean that bread and rolls have more sodium than the rest. Another interesting fact was that 75% of all the sodium we consume a day comes from food that we don’t make at home.  Think about that the next time you’re eating out!

The survey was based on food surveys answered by 7227 Americans which included 2,500 children and teens.

Read the original article here—courtesy of Times Healthland

Easy Chocolate Soufflé for Valentine’s Day

Chocolate Soufflé RecipeValentine’s Day is tomorrow! Why not impress your significant other or date with this homemade chocolate soufflé’. It is easier to make than you think! We found this recipe from eatingwell.com under the healthy Valentine’s Day treats category.

It is 331 calories per ramekin and this serves 2.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons granulated sugar, divided
  • 2 1/2 ounces semisweet or bittersweet chocolate, chopped
  • 1 large egg, separated, plus 2 large egg whites
  • 1 tablespoon heavy cream
  • 1 teaspoon all-purpose flour
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • Confectioners’ sugar, for dusting (optional)

Directions

  1. Position rack in center of oven; preheat to 375°F. Lightly coat two 10-ounce ramekins with cooking spray; coat the insides of each with 1 1/2 teaspoons sugar.
  1. Place chocolate in a small microwave-safe bowl. Microwave on Medium, stirring every 20 seconds, until melted, 1 to 2 minutes.
  1. Whisk egg yolk and cream in a medium bowl until combined. Whisk in the chocolate until smooth, then whisk in flour and cinnamon until incorporated.
  1. Beat egg whites and salt in a medium bowl with an electric mixer on high speed until soft peaks form. Beat in the remaining 2 tablespoons sugar in four additions, until stiff, glossy peaks form.
  1. Using a rubber spatula, gently fold half the beaten whites into the chocolate mixture until fairly smooth; then gently fold this combined mixture back into the remaining egg whites until no white streaks remain. Divide between the prepared ramekins and place on a baking sheet. Bake until puffed and firm to the touch, 18 to 22 minutes. Dust with confectioners’ sugar, if desired. Serve immediately.

click here for the original recipe with tips and nutrition–courtesy of eatingwell.com

Do you have any tips for making souffle?

Study Recommend Babies to Feed Themselves to Avoid Obesity

There’s a term for this—“baby-led weaning.” The definition is allowing infants “wean” themselves away from breast milk or formula by self-feeding tiny bits of cut-up foods, rather than being spoon-fed by their parents. The study had parents filled out surveys about their babies’ feeding and weaning practices, their infant’s favorite foods, and height and weight. There were 155 children aged 20 months to 6.5 years old in this study.

The results showed that on average, the baby-led group were at a healthy weight compared to the spoon-fed kids who were more likely to be overweight. The interesting part was that the finger-fed babies preferred to eat carbs (i.e. bread) over sweet foods and the spoon-fed kids liked sweet foods the most. The researchers also accounted for other factors for their weight such as family income and family history of obesity.

Researchers suggest that by having babies feed themselves, it may help babies become more aware of their own appetite and eating habits and discourage anxious parents from feeding their infants too much food.

What do you think of this study? Do you see any danger from this?

Read the original article here—Times Healthland

Can a Blood Test Help Predict Your Death?

A new study reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association and the European Society of Cardiology Congress discovered a certain enzyme that could be linked to both heart disease and cancer. By measuring this enzyme in blood, it could serve as an early predictor of who is most likely going to die from these health problems.

The study had almost 2,000 participants joined in two separate long-term trials where the researchers measured the level of cathepsin S, an enzyme involved in breaking up proteins. They followed the participants for 12.5 years and found that, “those who have the highest level of cathepsin S were more likely to die than those with lower or half of those levels.”

It is yet to be clear how cathepsin S might be related to heart disease or cancer, but this study is the first to find a marker associated both these leading killers of U.S adults. Overall, it is too early to know if cathepsin S will be handy in predicting who has the greatest risk, but already pharmaceutical companies are keeping their eyes on the progress.

Read the original article here-courtesy of Times Heathland

What do you think of this new study?

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