Kicking Cancer in the Kitchen: The Girlfriend’s Cookbook and Guide to Using Real Food to Fight Cancer

Kicking Cancer in the Kitchen: The Girlfriend’s Cookbook and Guide to Using Real Food to Fight Cancer, by Annette Ramke & Kendall Scott, is the ultimate resource for the woman who has been handed the cancer card–and for the one who never wants to get it.

Annette Ramke and Kendall Scott are two young cancer survivors who not only survived but learned to thrive throughout their cancer journey: from diagnosis through intense treatment and beyond. They know what it is like to be stopped in your tracks by what seems to be a death sentence. But they didn’t want to just slog their way through cancer; they also wanted to look and feel as good as possible while
doing it. And they did! They know exactly what it’s like to deal with “the Big C.” And in Kicking Cancer in the Kitchen they share girlfriend-style, real-life knowledge and experience about the healing power of food, along with their stories of cancer ups and
downs.
With more than 100 recipes for fighting cancer and soothing symptoms of treatment, whether someone is in the thick of “Cancer World” and wants to know what to expect, or for anyone who wants to do all they can to boost their health, Kicking Cancer in the Kitchen offers guidance on not only surviving, but thriving –before, during, and after cancer.

“…a beautiful, delicious, and effective way to improve your health at any time—whether or not you have cancer or any disease. In fact, I recommend that all follow this sort of diet for optimal health!”— Christiane Northrup, M.D., author of the New York Times bestsellers: Women’s Bodies, Women’s Wisdom and The Wisdom of Menopause

“An essential guide to using food as medicine and creating an inhospitable environment for cancer, while delighting your palette and invigorating your senses. Getting well has never been more fun or tasty!” — Mark Hyman, MD, #1 NYT Bestseller, The Blood Sugar Solution

Learn more at thekickingkitchen.com.

 

 

 

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Red Rice Risotto

Redrice

If you are trying to incorporate more whole grains into your diet this red rice dish is a delicious and hearty meal. Red rice is also known as “weedy rice”, as it sometimes grows as a weed in commercial rice fields. Its fiber and protein content make it a great addition to any meal.

 

Ingredients
Makes 4

  • 1 cup red rice
  • 2 shallots, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 cup porcini (or any variety you like) mushroom, sliced
  • 2 cups mushroom broth (veggie is fine also)
  • a couple hearty handfuls of spinach
  • olive oil
  • sea salt
  • freshly ground pepper

Preparation

  1. Soak rice in cold water for a few hours before cooking. (If you don’t have time, give it a good rinse and proceed).
  2. Coat a large pot with olive oil and place over medium high heat. Add onion, season with salt & pepper and cook until translucent, about one minute. Add garlic and cook for another minute, until soft.
  3. Add mushrooms, season and cook for about three minutes until soft and slightly browned.
  4. Add rice and let cook for about a minute, stirring throughout to mix.
  5. Add broth and bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium and let simmer, stirring occasionally, until most of the water is absorbed (you don’t want the risotto totally dry at this point). Add spinach, mix to combine and remove from heat. Cover for about three minutes.
  6. Uncover, fluff with fork, season with salt, pepper and cheese to your liking. Serve immediately.

 

Recipe courtesy of GOOP.com

Hold the Yolk Please

For many people eggs are a staple diet food. They have been praised for having all 9 essential amino acids and a high protein content. In addition they are great for eyes, contain lots of “good” fats, and are a good source of vitamin D.

But the topic of cholesterol has always come up with eggs and a new study from, the journal Atherosclerosis, reveals that an egg’s cholesterol is dangerous for people over the age of 40. The study reveals that egg yolks contributed to the artery-clogging LDL cholesterol and this makes egg consumption problematic over the age of 40 when there is a higher risk for heart disease.

The health implications of overconsumption of whole eggs has even been compared to the risks assoicated with smoking. The study evaluated artery health of patients who smoked and those who consumed whole eggs. The results are in and for those whose consumption of whole eggs was in the highest 20%, the narrowing of the carotid artery was on average about two-thirds that of the study’s heaviest smokers.

This study may have you asking, how much is too much cholesterol?

According to the National Heart Blood and Lung Institute, Americans should  limit their cholesterol intake to no more than 300 mg per day (an egg yolk has just over 200 mg), and eat no more than four whole eggs weekly.

This is good news for those who look forward to weekend egg breakfast with friends and family. And like so many things in life moderation is key!

Enjoy!

To read more of this article click HERE

~Professional Medical Corp

Friday Treat: Pistachio Stuffed Dates

Have you been searching for a simple, elegant, and healthy snack? This recipe is ideal as an appetizer for entertaining or an end of meal treat. This high in fiber snack will also help to keep you full longer. Best of all it takes no time to prepare!

Ingredients

  •  1/2 cup shelled pistachios
  •  Pinch of coarse salt
  •  16 dates, pitted
  •  1 tablespoon toasted unsweetened shredded coconut

Directions

1. In a food processor, puree pistachios until a thick paste forms, about 5 minutes. Season with salt. Spoon mixture into dates. Top with coconut.

Whole Living

When Friday rolls around there is no better time for a special treat to end the week with…

Enjoy!

~Professional Medical Corp.

Olympian’s, Just Like Us?

The excitement was felt worldwide last night as the London 2012 Summer Olympic Games kicked off.

The athletes are ready for the greatest physical competition of their lives and this opening day is a result of a life time of work.  Daily training, diet, and mental preparation all play a role in whether they achieve gold.

Discovering Olympians’ diets or training secrets has always been a great American past time. Is it because we all have dreams of someday standing on a podium as the crowd shouts, “USA, USA”?

To fuel up like Olympian swimmer Michael Phelps keep in mind that he eats up to 12,000 calories a day. Some of his favorite foods include french toast, pancakes, eggs, pasta, and energy drinks!

While other athletes have different culinary choices, like tennis player Venus Williams, who chose a raw vegan diet plan to accompany her to the Olympics.

One thing is for sure, these athletes burn more calories than average people. But is it possible that eating like an Olympian will help you reach that gold medal? It’s possible, perhaps if you are burning 3,000 plus calories a day…like many Olympians.

So how many calories do they burn? Read more HERE to find out.

Enjoy the 2012 Summer Games!

~Professional Medical Corp.

FDA’s New Safety Plan for Opioids

The Food and Drug Administration has taken a stand against opioid abuse with their new safety measures.

This plan is a result of the fast growing prescription drug epidemic in the United States. Opioids are at the heart of this widespread debate, as they are prescribed for chronic pain, and sometimes over prescribed or abused because of their highly addictive qualities.

The abuse of common opioids such as OxyContin, hydromorphone, oxymorphone, and fentanyl have contributed to the increase in annual opioid related deaths. “In 2008, nearly 15,000 Americans died where opioids were involved. In 2009, that number went up to 16,000” according to the FDA.

In order to cut down on the abuse of these drugs the FDA has established guidelines for manufactures to better educate physicians.

“The education guidelines will include information on weighing the risks and benefits of opioid therapy, choosing patients appropriately, managing and monitoring patients, and counseling patients on the safe use of these drugs.”

For more information please read the full article HERE.

Other information provided by the FDA.

~Professional Medical Corp.

Nuts for Almonds

Mornings seem to be the quickest time of the day, with a lot to remember before we walk out the door, breakfast often is the last thing on our minds.

Smoothies are a great way to deliver a nutritional punch on a tight schedule. Often smoothies are known to have a dairy base but for those who can’t have dairy there are many alternative “milks” and almond milk is one of those. Almond milk (sweeten, unsweetened, or flavored) is gluten-free, promotes good cholesterol balance in the body, and is low in carbs. Read more about the medicinal benefits of almonds HERE.

A delicious addition to any smoothie is seasonal fruit. This time of year is known for fresh strawberries, raspberries, and blueberries. Try something new and enjoy!

Almond and Berry Smoothie

Ingredients

  • 1/2 medium banana, peeled and cut into chunks
  • 1/4 cup frozen blueberries
  • 1/4 cup frozen strawberries
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh mango
  • 2 cups chilled unsweetened vanilla-flavored almond milk

Directions

In a blender, add the banana chunks, blueberries, strawberries, and mango. Blend until combined, about 30 seconds. Serve in chilled glasses with straws.

Recipe can also be found at Food Network .

~Professional Medical Corp.