Quick Tips: Getting in Shape Without Spending Money

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When you stay active, you feel better and have more energy for work and leisure time. You’re more able to do the things you enjoy, like playing with children, gardening, dancing, or biking.

Staying fit helps you sleep better, handle stress better, and keep your mind sharp. It’s good for your heart, lungs, bones, and joints. And it lowers your risk for heart attack, diabetes, high blood pressure, and some cancers.

And although it’s easy to spend a lot of money on sports and activities that help keep you in shape, it’s just as easy to get into shape and stay there without spending any money at all.

Remember to work on all three types of fitness: flexibility, muscle strength, and aerobic fitness.

Flexibility

  • Stretch all your major groups of muscles. These include the muscles of your arms, your back, your hips, the front and back of your thighs, and your calves.
  • Stretch slowly and regularly to help yourself be more flexible. Combining stretching with other fitness activities is best.
  • Warm up your muscles for 5 to 10 minutes before your stretch them.
  • Try to hold each stretch for 15 to 30 seconds.
  • Do some stretches first thing in the morning.
  • Take a “stretch break” instead of a coffee break at work.
  • Try activities that include stretching, such as dance, martial arts (aikido or karate), tai chi, or yoga.

Muscle fitness

  • Do housework and yard work on a regular basis: Scrub the bathtub, wash walls, till the garden, or pull weeds.
  • Do basic muscle-conditioning exercises such as push-ups, leg lifts, and other familiar exercises.
  • Try muscle-strengthening exercises using weights. You can use cans of food instead of buying dumbbells.

Aerobic fitness

Experts say to do either of these things:

  • Moderate activity for at least 2½ hours a week. Moderate activity means things like brisk walking, brisk cycling, or shooting baskets. But any activities—including daily chores—that raise your heart rate can be included.
  • Vigorous activity for at least 1¼ hours a week. Vigorous activity means things like jogging, cycling fast, or playing a basketball game.

These ordinary activities cost nothing and all count as aerobic activity:

  • Walking briskly to work or to do errands
  • Pushing a lawn mower
  • Vacuuming
  • Sweeping (perhaps to fast-paced music)
  • Raking leaves or shoveling snow
  • Dancing
  • Playing actively with your children
  • Walking the dog

If you need more structure for your exercise but don’t want to spend money for a class, check out exercise DVDs from the library.

Try these suggestions at work:

  • Use your morning commute to get in some extra walking. Park several blocks away, or get off the bus a few stops earlier.
  • Take the stairs instead of the elevator, at least for a few floors.
  • Suggest holding meetings with colleagues during a walk inside or outside the building.
  • Go the extra distance when possible: Get your coffee on another floor (take the stairs) or use the restroom that’s the farthest from your office.
  • Stand and do simple stretches while you make phone calls. A speakerphone may help.
  • If you need to speak to a colleague, walk to that person’s office rather than using e-mail or the phone.
  • Use your lunch hour for a workout: Take a brisk walk, jog, or bike ride. Don’t skip lunch. Eat it at your desk while you check your mail or listen to phone messages.

What are your suggestions? Comment Below!

Article Courtesy of: www.Health.com

School is Out!!!

For many of us this poses a BIG question… WHAT DO I DO WITH THE KIDS????

What-should-I-do-with-my-life_2

 

Either as grandparents who are watching them while school is out or for stay at home parents or working parents who take a stay-cation at home over the summer.. it is an everyday struggle…

3d human with a red question mark

Here is a list we found of 100 things you can do… a lot of them are geared toward younger children but be creative! We bet that even a teenager would love to build a birdhouse or create a scrapbook!

100 Things to Do!

 

 

Summer is Time for Fun and Health

Summer is a great time to build up your fitness program, enjoy fresh fruits and vegetables, take a vacation, and have fun. It’s also a time to pay attention to your health and safety. Below are tips to help you stay safe and healthy this summer and all year long.

Keep your cool in the sun. Sun protection is important all year round, not just during the summer or at the beach. Take steps to help prevent skin cancer and other conditions. Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable, yet many people succumb to extreme heat each year.

Take steps to lower your risk for heat-related illness. When possible, avoid outdoor activities during midday, when the sun’s rays are strongest, and cover up with clothing and a wide-brimmed hat to protect exposed skin. Don’t forget your sunscreen.

Unfortunately, warmer temperatures aren’t just attractive to people, but to mosquitoes, ticks, and fleas, too.

Mosquitoes can transmit West Nile virus and other viruses, ticks can transmit Lyme disease and other serious infections, and fleas can transmit plague. To lower your risk for West Nile virus, avoid mosquito bites when you spend time outside working or playing.

The risk of severe illness and death is highest for people over 50 years old, although people of all ages can become ill.

Whether you plan to grill on the patio or picnic in the park, be sure to eat balanced meals with plenty of fruits and vegetables. Fruits and vegetables have important vitamins, minerals, and fiber, which may help protect you from some chronic diseases.

Foodborne disease is caused by consuming contaminated foods or beverages. An estimated 76 million cases of foodborne disease occur each year in the United States. Most of these cases are mild and cause symptoms for a day or two, but some cases are more serious and require hospitalization.

Summer is a great time to play outdoor games, garden, or go for a walk. Start a new routine that combines fun and physical activity. Active people are less likely than inactive people to be obese or to have high blood pressure, diabetes, osteoporosis, coronary artery disease and stroke, depression, colon cancer, and premature death. Adults should get 30 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity most (preferably all) days of the week.

Don’t forget to take steps to prepare yourself and your family for severe weather and natural disasters before they happen. If a natural or man-made disaster strikes your community, you might not have access to food, water, and electricity for a while.

By taking steps now to store emergency food and water supplies, along with a disaster supplies kit, you can reduce the effect of any such disaster on your family.

This article is made possible with Older Americans Act dollars from the Land of the Dancing Sky Area Agency on Aging. The Area Agencies provide a free information and assistance service called the Senior LinkAge Line that assists older adults and their caregivers with a variety of options for living independently. Call the Senior LinkAge LineÆ at 800-333-2433 to speak with an information specialist, or check out our website at MinnesotaHelp.info.

 

Karin Haugrud is a Senior LinkAge Line Specialist with Land of the Dancing Sky – West Central in Fergus Falls.

Friday Treat: Pistachio Stuffed Dates

Have you been searching for a simple, elegant, and healthy snack? This recipe is ideal as an appetizer for entertaining or an end of meal treat. This high in fiber snack will also help to keep you full longer. Best of all it takes no time to prepare!

Ingredients

  •  1/2 cup shelled pistachios
  •  Pinch of coarse salt
  •  16 dates, pitted
  •  1 tablespoon toasted unsweetened shredded coconut

Directions

1. In a food processor, puree pistachios until a thick paste forms, about 5 minutes. Season with salt. Spoon mixture into dates. Top with coconut.

Whole Living

When Friday rolls around there is no better time for a special treat to end the week with…

Enjoy!

~Professional Medical Corp.

Great Places to See – Bellingham

With summer temperatures finally heating up there is no better time to get outside and enjoy the beautiful Pacific Northwest. If you are looking for a short distance trip or an overnight excursion the city of Bellingham is just what you need.

The city offers a variety of activities for all ages and lifestyles. From outdoor hiking and biking at Galbraith Mountain to dinner for two in historic Fairhaven . There are also many local businesses to enjoy downtown, such as INNATE which is a must see destination for art and one of a kind screen printing.

Bellingham’s Saturday market is the place to be during the summer, it offers great produce, ready to eat food, and crafts. It’s no surprise that it has been ranked the number one farmer’s market by Sunset Magazine.

Get out there and enjoy the community of Bellingham which is just far enough away so you feel like you are on vacation but close enough to the comforts of home. Enjoy!

~Professional Medical Corp.

 

 

Healthy Asian Salad

Warm Snow Pea & Chicken Salad RecipeWarm up to the new spring weather was this healthy and tasty salad recipe from eatingwell.com. This salad is unique due to the snow peas as the base vegetable and the nutty taste of the cashews which combines into a fresh and flavorful dish for the whole family. Reviews say you can substitute snow peas for green beans.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breast, trimmed
  • 1 14-ounce can reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 3 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • 3 teaspoons toasted sesame oil, divided
  • 2 tablespoons tahini, or cashew butter
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 pound snow peas, trimmed and thinly slivered lengthwise
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cashews

Directions

  1. Place chicken in a medium skillet or saucepan and add broth; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to low, and simmer gently until cooked through and no longer pink in the middle, 10 to 12 minutes. Transfer the chicken to a cutting board to cool. Shred into bite-size pieces. (Cool and refrigerate the broth, reserving it for another use.)
  2. Meanwhile, whisk vinegar, soy sauce, 2 teaspoons sesame oil and tahini (or cashew butter) in a large bowl until smooth.
  3. Heat the remaining 1 teaspoon oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add ginger and garlic and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Stir in slivered peas and cook, stirring, until bright green, 3 to 4 minutes. Transfer to the bowl with the dressing.
  4. Add the chicken to the bowl with the peas; toss to combine. Serve sprinkled with cashews.

What do you think of this recipe?

Click here for the original recipe & nutrition information—courtesy of eatingwell.com

Professional Medical

Ways to Help the Environment

Earth Day is this Sunday (April 22) and we thought we would show you ways to save the planet from realsimple.com. It can be things that you can do for now on and not necessarily for one day. Not only could you save money, you are help making the world a better place to live.

  1. Think local: It is better to find food near you—because not only will you conserve gas, you are able to reduce pollution and enjoy a lot of fresher food. Check online, there might be plenty of green markets, farm stands, and conscientious supermarkets around you.
  2. Organic-cotton tees: Ever thought of purchasing organic t-shirts? Well, maybe it is time. Cotton is the second most chemically sprayed crop in America with corn being first. Maybe think about that when you’re at the mall.
  3. Recycled napkins: Did you know that if every American purchased one package of 100% recycled napkins, we would save 1 million trees. That’s a lot! Maybe consider purchasing recycled tissues and paper-towels too!
  4. Donate old phones: Approximately 130 million cellphones are retired each year which results in 65,000 tons of waste which could include hazardous materials. There are websites such as call2recycle.org or collectivegood.com that tells you where you can drop your phone off to be recycled.

What are some ways that you do to save the planet?

Click here to find more ways and read the original article—courtesy of www.realsimple.com

Professional Medical