Summer is Time for Fun and Health

Summer is a great time to build up your fitness program, enjoy fresh fruits and vegetables, take a vacation, and have fun. It’s also a time to pay attention to your health and safety. Below are tips to help you stay safe and healthy this summer and all year long.

Keep your cool in the sun. Sun protection is important all year round, not just during the summer or at the beach. Take steps to help prevent skin cancer and other conditions. Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable, yet many people succumb to extreme heat each year.

Take steps to lower your risk for heat-related illness. When possible, avoid outdoor activities during midday, when the sun’s rays are strongest, and cover up with clothing and a wide-brimmed hat to protect exposed skin. Don’t forget your sunscreen.

Unfortunately, warmer temperatures aren’t just attractive to people, but to mosquitoes, ticks, and fleas, too.

Mosquitoes can transmit West Nile virus and other viruses, ticks can transmit Lyme disease and other serious infections, and fleas can transmit plague. To lower your risk for West Nile virus, avoid mosquito bites when you spend time outside working or playing.

The risk of severe illness and death is highest for people over 50 years old, although people of all ages can become ill.

Whether you plan to grill on the patio or picnic in the park, be sure to eat balanced meals with plenty of fruits and vegetables. Fruits and vegetables have important vitamins, minerals, and fiber, which may help protect you from some chronic diseases.

Foodborne disease is caused by consuming contaminated foods or beverages. An estimated 76 million cases of foodborne disease occur each year in the United States. Most of these cases are mild and cause symptoms for a day or two, but some cases are more serious and require hospitalization.

Summer is a great time to play outdoor games, garden, or go for a walk. Start a new routine that combines fun and physical activity. Active people are less likely than inactive people to be obese or to have high blood pressure, diabetes, osteoporosis, coronary artery disease and stroke, depression, colon cancer, and premature death. Adults should get 30 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity most (preferably all) days of the week.

Don’t forget to take steps to prepare yourself and your family for severe weather and natural disasters before they happen. If a natural or man-made disaster strikes your community, you might not have access to food, water, and electricity for a while.

By taking steps now to store emergency food and water supplies, along with a disaster supplies kit, you can reduce the effect of any such disaster on your family.

This article is made possible with Older Americans Act dollars from the Land of the Dancing Sky Area Agency on Aging. The Area Agencies provide a free information and assistance service called the Senior LinkAge Line that assists older adults and their caregivers with a variety of options for living independently. Call the Senior LinkAge LineÆ at 800-333-2433 to speak with an information specialist, or check out our website at MinnesotaHelp.info.

 

Karin Haugrud is a Senior LinkAge Line Specialist with Land of the Dancing Sky – West Central in Fergus Falls.

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Kicking Cancer in the Kitchen: The Girlfriend’s Cookbook and Guide to Using Real Food to Fight Cancer

Kicking Cancer in the Kitchen: The Girlfriend’s Cookbook and Guide to Using Real Food to Fight Cancer, by Annette Ramke & Kendall Scott, is the ultimate resource for the woman who has been handed the cancer card–and for the one who never wants to get it.

Annette Ramke and Kendall Scott are two young cancer survivors who not only survived but learned to thrive throughout their cancer journey: from diagnosis through intense treatment and beyond. They know what it is like to be stopped in your tracks by what seems to be a death sentence. But they didn’t want to just slog their way through cancer; they also wanted to look and feel as good as possible while
doing it. And they did! They know exactly what it’s like to deal with “the Big C.” And in Kicking Cancer in the Kitchen they share girlfriend-style, real-life knowledge and experience about the healing power of food, along with their stories of cancer ups and
downs.
With more than 100 recipes for fighting cancer and soothing symptoms of treatment, whether someone is in the thick of “Cancer World” and wants to know what to expect, or for anyone who wants to do all they can to boost their health, Kicking Cancer in the Kitchen offers guidance on not only surviving, but thriving –before, during, and after cancer.

“…a beautiful, delicious, and effective way to improve your health at any time—whether or not you have cancer or any disease. In fact, I recommend that all follow this sort of diet for optimal health!”— Christiane Northrup, M.D., author of the New York Times bestsellers: Women’s Bodies, Women’s Wisdom and The Wisdom of Menopause

“An essential guide to using food as medicine and creating an inhospitable environment for cancer, while delighting your palette and invigorating your senses. Getting well has never been more fun or tasty!” — Mark Hyman, MD, #1 NYT Bestseller, The Blood Sugar Solution

Learn more at thekickingkitchen.com.

 

 

 

Do You Want to Learn More About Caregiving?

Giving

Challenges in Caregiving: Giving Care, Taking Care, a caregiver training conference will be offered on Monday, June 3, 2013 at the Tukwila Community Center in Tukwila, Washington. The event is hosted by Aging and Disability Services Administration, Full Life Care and Pierce County Community Connections/Aging and Long Term Care along with the support of numerous community organizations. The conference is designed to provide current, practical skills and resources that community caregivers can use in their daily caregiving responsibilities. The conference is intended for:

• Family caregivers (spouses, adult children, parents of adults with disabilities, or other relatives)
• Home care workers and adult day services staff
• Adult family home or assisted living staff
• Social service or mental health professionals who work with family caregivers

The Early Registration fee (by May 15) for individual caregivers is $30. Scholarships are available for unpaid family caregivers. The Early Registration fee for agency-based caregivers is $50. Fees include workshops, lunch and resource exhibits. Registration forms will be available in April and space is limited – so don’t delay! For more information or to receive a full brochure and registration materials, please call 1-800-422-3263 or 360-725-2544.

~Professional Medical Corp.

Are Your Medical Bills Out of Control?

If you are like many America’s facing unexpected medical bills the task of sorting through invoices can be tedious.

Patients are frustrated to receive multiple bills, for such things as hospital services, with little to no explanations as to what the invoice includes.

None of this surprises Pat Palmer, the founder of Medical Billing Advocates of America. “We get feedback from consumers saying that providers are telling them ‘We can’t give you an itemized statement’ or ‘You should have asked for it before you left the hospital.'”

For those with confusing or huge hospital bills some experts’ advise patients to take the following steps.

Knowing your patient rights within a doctor’s office or hospital is the first step in avoiding financial disagreements. Make it clear that you are aware of your legal right to have such things as an itemizes invoice.

Get explanations in writing and take protests to the top. All communications with a provider should be in writing and if customer service departments are not helpful avoid them and write a letter to the chief financial officer.

Ask for help from you insurer. They have a responsibility to some degree to what happens between you and a contracted physician and can often be a great ally.

And finally seek help and file complaints if your bill is much higher then you expected or can afford. Organizations such as Medical Billing Advocates of America and Health Proponent can help you fight charges or lower your bill.

To learn more read HERE

~Professional Medical Corp.

New Mental Health Coverage

Obamacare Bumper StickerMental health has been on the minds’ of Americans in recent years, with the rise of gun violence and substance addiction, many are asking for a better solution to this epidemic.
In the beginning of this month President Obama pledged to strengthen our nation’s mental health systems by fixing Americans access to healthcare. Obama’s administration plans on preventing mental health issues by making counseling and addiction serves available to everyone. When the 2010 Affordable Care Act is fully implemented next year, millions of Americans stand to gain access to such care for the first time.
Opponents to Obamacare worry that the Affordable Care Act will be a serious strain on providers.  With the concern now on whether the providers and the delivery systems can take care of all of them, the debate over Obama’s initiative has many asking, what is really best for our patients?

For more information READ HERE

Are They Your Vaccinations?

Medical personnel and flu shotsThe flu season may finally be coming to an end in the U.S. and after an extreme season, compared to previous years, many are eager for it to conclude.

Getting vaccinated has become one of our best defenses against the illness, but a recent report put the vaccine’s effectiveness at 62 percent, and many American’s are not sold on getting the vaccination.

There is also a rising debate for whether the vaccine should be mandatory for hospitals and other high risk organization. Hospital administrators are grappling with whether to compel doctors, nurses and other medical staff to get vaccinated which as of now is not required.

The flu continues to hit older people hard, with more than 50 percent of hospitalizations involving adults 65 years and older. For hospital workers alone 60% get the shot, according to a report by the California Department of Public Health. The federal government has set a goal of 90% by 2020.

With an estimated 36,000 people dying from the flu and its complications in a typical season, the debate for vaccination isn’t going away anytime soon. One thing that president-elect of the California Medical Association, Richard Thorp, hopes is that “we all agree that you come to the hospital to get well, not to get sick.”

To read more please click HERE

~Professional Medical Corp.

Hold the Yolk Please

For many people eggs are a staple diet food. They have been praised for having all 9 essential amino acids and a high protein content. In addition they are great for eyes, contain lots of “good” fats, and are a good source of vitamin D.

But the topic of cholesterol has always come up with eggs and a new study from, the journal Atherosclerosis, reveals that an egg’s cholesterol is dangerous for people over the age of 40. The study reveals that egg yolks contributed to the artery-clogging LDL cholesterol and this makes egg consumption problematic over the age of 40 when there is a higher risk for heart disease.

The health implications of overconsumption of whole eggs has even been compared to the risks assoicated with smoking. The study evaluated artery health of patients who smoked and those who consumed whole eggs. The results are in and for those whose consumption of whole eggs was in the highest 20%, the narrowing of the carotid artery was on average about two-thirds that of the study’s heaviest smokers.

This study may have you asking, how much is too much cholesterol?

According to the National Heart Blood and Lung Institute, Americans should  limit their cholesterol intake to no more than 300 mg per day (an egg yolk has just over 200 mg), and eat no more than four whole eggs weekly.

This is good news for those who look forward to weekend egg breakfast with friends and family. And like so many things in life moderation is key!

Enjoy!

To read more of this article click HERE

~Professional Medical Corp