Falls and Older Adults

Risk Increases With Age

Many people have a friend or relative who has fallen. The person may have slipped while walking or felt dizzy when standing up from a chair and fallen. Maybe you’ve fallen yourself.

If you or an older person you know has fallen, you’re not alone. More than one in three people age 65 years or older falls each year. The risk of falling — and fall-related problems — rises with age.

Falls Lead to Fractures, Trauma

Each year, more than 1.6 million older U.S. adults go to emergency departments for fall-related injuries. Among older adults, falls are the number one cause of fractures, hospital admissions for trauma, loss of independence, and injury deaths.

Fractures caused by falls can lead to hospital stays and disability. Most often, fall-related fractures are in the person’s hip, pelvis, spine, arm, hand, or ankle.

Hip fractures are one of the most serious types of fall injury. They are a leading cause of injury and loss of independence, among older adults. Most healthy, independent older adults who are hospitalized for a broken hip are able to return home or live on their own after treatment and rehabilitation. Most of those who cannot return to independent living after such injuries had physical or mental disabilities before the fracture. Many of them will need long-term care.

Fear of Falling

Many older adults are afraid of falling. This fear becomes more common as people age, even among those who haven’t fallen. It may lead older people to avoid activities such as walking, shopping, or taking part in social activities.

If you’re worried about falling, talk with your doctor or another health care provider. Your doctor may refer you to a physical therapist. Physical therapy can help you improve your balance and walking and help build your walking confidence. Getting rid of your fear of falling can help you to stay active, maintain your physical health, and prevent future falls.

Tell Your Doctor If You Fall

If you fall, be sure to discuss the fall with your doctor, even if you aren’t hurt. Many underlying causes of falls can be treated or corrected. For example, falls can be a sign of a new medical problem that needs attention, such as diabetes or changes in blood pressure, particularly drops in blood pressure on standing up. They can also be a sign of problems with your medications or eyesight that can be corrected. After a fall, your doctor may suggest changes in your medication or your eyewear prescription. He or she may also suggest physical therapy, use of a walking aid, or other steps to help prevent future falls. These steps can also make you more confident in your abilities.

Ways to Prevent Falls

Exercise to improve your balance and strengthen your muscles helps to prevent falls. Not wearing bifocal or multifocal glasses when you walk, especially on stairs, will make you less likely to fall. You can also make your home safer by removing loose rugs, adding handrails to stairs and hallways, and making sure you have adequate lighting in dark areas.

Falls are not an inevitable part of life, even as a person gets older. You can take action to prevent falls. Your doctor or other health care providers can help you decide what changes will help.

http://nihseniorhealth.gov/falls/aboutfalls/01.html

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Insulin Resistance: The Real Reason Why You Aren’t Losing Weight

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Many people have weight loss as one of their key resolutions. Sadly, 35 percent of people also give up on that goal before the month even ends. It’s not necessarily lack of time or willpower that causes you to struggle with weight loss year after year. The real reason that you may have struggled to lose weight is insulin resistance, or a condition I call metabolism dysfunction.

So you may be thinking, “Why is it so hard for me to lose weight?” I’m doing “everything right,” and yet still weight loss is difficult. Perhaps (like many of my patients) you’re already following a strict diet and working out several times a week, but to no avail. The weight still won’t come off — or, worse, you are gaining weight for seemingly no reason at all! You have become resigned to being overweight.

Weight problems aren’t a permanent and immovable fixture for the rest of your life. If you’re finding that weight is easy to gain and hard to lose, it’s not your fault! Weight problems aren’t just about overeating or under exercising — they’re about metabolic changes (The MD Factor Diet, 2015) that are collectively known as insulin resistance. Lab tests conducted in my practice have confirmed that over 89 percent of my patients have this real and often undiagnosed issue. So the good news is that the right combination of diet, exercise, and will to succeed you can reverse your MD factor and finally find success in losing weight and keeping it off for good.

In a nutshell, insulin resistance is the inability of your body to properly convert the food that you eat into energy to fuel your cells. People with the MD Factor have difficulty regulating their blood sugar, which is often due to insulin resistance or even diabetes. In both instances, their bodies are unable to pull glucose into the cells, which means that excess levels of glucose build up in the blood. With nowhere else to go, the body turns this extra energy into fat and stores it for later.

This infographic outlines the symptoms and causes of insulin resistance, or metabolism dysfunction.

2015-01-07-MDFactorinforgraphic.jpg

Surprisingly, you don’t have to be overweight for your cells to be insulin-resistant. Even if your weight is perfectly normal, you can still suffer from its effects. Metabolism dysfunction doesn’t develop overnight and could be caused by one or more triggers including: aging and menopause, genetics, belly/visceral fat, medications, and nutritional deficiencies. We’ll cover all these in subsequent posts. But for now, we’ll cover the two reasons you have no control over — genetic predisposition and aging.

DNA has a big impact on your weight (The MD Factor Diet, 2015). When I was in medical school I read an article that made a lasting impression. It said that if both parents were obese, the child had an 80 percent likelihood of becoming obese. This struck me not only because it’s a staggering statistic, but because my family has always suffered with our weight, I have to be very mindful of my own diet and exercise because I’m genetically predisposed to gain and retain weight.

You may have been born with cells that don’t respond well to insulin. If your family has a history of diabetes (particularly from your parents) you’re at high risk of developing a dysfunctional metabolism. Your genes also determine how your body stores fat (e.g., if you’re apple-shaped, you’ll carry fat in your abdominal area and be at risk of having two contributing factors — genetics and belly fat — to your Insulin Resistance).

Just like we can’t control the genes we were born with, we all grow older. As this occurs, our hormones gradually decline. Declining hormone levels affect muscle mass causing it to be lost first while your body holds onto its fat stores. As you age, you need to be more mindful of what you eat and your physical lifestyle. After all, few of us can eat the same at 50 as we did at 30.

There are several examples of correlation of aging and weight. Pre-menopausal women typically gain 10-15 pounds (though I’ve had patients with up to 30-pound weight gain) around menopause (Women’s Health Research Program, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia). It’s not just hormones like testosterone and estrogen that shift to affect your weight. The body’s ability to use insulin does gradually decline, though it can be slowed by diet and regular physical activity. Type 2 diabetes has been shown to get more prevalent as you age, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Currently, half of all Americans aged 65 years and older have prediabetes. Without lifestyle changes to improve their health and manage Insulin Resistance, up to 30 percent of people with prediabetes will develop Type 2 diabetes within five years.

In order to avoid weight gain, diabetes, and other medical problems (like heart disease) as you age, you need to eat and exercise to minimize the effects of insulin resistance.

Do you have a dysfunctional metabolism?
My patients feel a lot better about their weight struggles once they realize that they’re overweight not because they ate too much or are lazy. Body weight and weight regulation are highly complex and influenced by many different genes. You may have been born with factors out of your control, but you can put that control back in your capable hands.

Where do we go from here?
Insulin resistance is caused by changes in how your body is able to use the nutrients in your food. It’s very common, but not often recognized by those who have it — or their physicians.

If you’ve tried to lose weight and haven’t made any real progress, one thing is certain: Your metabolism has changed. Your old metabolism has been replaced by one that likes storing fat.

Healthy lifestyle and diet is important and can help regulate insulin levels. Exercise can also help the body regulate blood glucose and keep excess weight off.

You may have been born with genetic predisposition to gain and retain weight, but by making a few lifestyle changes, you can reverse the impact of the MD factor. By adjusting your diet and lifestyle, you can eat better, sleep better, have more energy, be sharper and more focused and lower your risk for heart disease, some cancers, stroke and dementia (The MD Factor Diet 2015).

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/caroline-j-cederquist-md/metabolism-dysfunction-th_b_6430370.html?utm_hp_ref=healthy-living

Are They Your Vaccinations?

Medical personnel and flu shotsThe flu season may finally be coming to an end in the U.S. and after an extreme season, compared to previous years, many are eager for it to conclude.

Getting vaccinated has become one of our best defenses against the illness, but a recent report put the vaccine’s effectiveness at 62 percent, and many American’s are not sold on getting the vaccination.

There is also a rising debate for whether the vaccine should be mandatory for hospitals and other high risk organization. Hospital administrators are grappling with whether to compel doctors, nurses and other medical staff to get vaccinated which as of now is not required.

The flu continues to hit older people hard, with more than 50 percent of hospitalizations involving adults 65 years and older. For hospital workers alone 60% get the shot, according to a report by the California Department of Public Health. The federal government has set a goal of 90% by 2020.

With an estimated 36,000 people dying from the flu and its complications in a typical season, the debate for vaccination isn’t going away anytime soon. One thing that president-elect of the California Medical Association, Richard Thorp, hopes is that “we all agree that you come to the hospital to get well, not to get sick.”

To read more please click HERE

~Professional Medical Corp.

Baked Salmon with Southeast Asian Marinade

In honor of Heart Association month, we found that delicious and healthy recipe from mayoclinic.com for baked salmon. Not only is this great for your heart, it would please your mouth buds as well!

Serves: 2

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup pineapple juice
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 teaspoon low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 2 salmon fillets, each 4 ounces
  • 1/4 teaspoon sesame oil
  • Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1 cup diced fresh fruit, such as pineapple, mango and papaya

Directions:

  1. In a small bowl, add the pineapple juice, garlic, soy sauce and ginger. Stir to mix evenly.
  2. Arrange the salmon fillets in a small baking dish. Pour the pineapple juice mixture over the top. Put in the refrigerator and marinate for 1 hour. Turn the salmon periodically as needed.
  3. Preheat the oven to 375 F. Lightly coat 2 squares of aluminum foil with cooking spray. Place the marinated salmon fillets on the aluminum foil. Drizzle each with 1/8 teaspoon sesame oil. Sprinkle with pepper and top each with 1/2 cup diced fruit.
  4. Wrap the foil around the salmon, folding the edges down to seal. Bake until the fish is opaque throughout when tested with the tip of a knife, about 10 minutes on each side. Transfer the salmon to warmed individual plates and serve immediately.

What other recipes do you have?

Click here for the original recipe and nutrition info—courtesy of http://www.mayoclinic.com

Professional Medical

Can a Blood Test Help Predict Your Death?

A new study reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association and the European Society of Cardiology Congress discovered a certain enzyme that could be linked to both heart disease and cancer. By measuring this enzyme in blood, it could serve as an early predictor of who is most likely going to die from these health problems.

The study had almost 2,000 participants joined in two separate long-term trials where the researchers measured the level of cathepsin S, an enzyme involved in breaking up proteins. They followed the participants for 12.5 years and found that, “those who have the highest level of cathepsin S were more likely to die than those with lower or half of those levels.”

It is yet to be clear how cathepsin S might be related to heart disease or cancer, but this study is the first to find a marker associated both these leading killers of U.S adults. Overall, it is too early to know if cathepsin S will be handy in predicting who has the greatest risk, but already pharmaceutical companies are keeping their eyes on the progress.

Read the original article here-courtesy of Times Heathland

What do you think of this new study?

Professional Medical

Should Sugar be Regulated like Alcohol and Cigarettes?

Well, some scientists think so. Researchers from the University of California-San Francisco believe that sugar is so destructive to the public health that it should be regulated like alcohol and cigarettes.

Recently, the researchers announced that this dangerous consumption of sugar intake is contributing to the obesity pandemic and is causing many health problems such as liver damage, high blood pressure, and altering people’s hormones. They claim in their article, “The Toxic Truth about Sugar,” that this high consumption of sugar tripled worldwide in the last 50 years and is contributing to 35 million deaths.

In order to lower consumption, the researchers recommend taxation, controlling availability, and tightening requirements to sell sugary snacks and drinks in places like school and work.

However, the American Beverage Association and the Sugar Association believe that the article is without scientific merit. The Sugar Association even believes that the authors are being reckless by scaring the public with the harm and effects of sugar.

The researchers argue back that, “‘we’re not advocating a major imposition of the government into people’s lives,’” and that their ultimate goal is to “‘actually increase people’s choices by making foods that aren’t loaded with sugar comparatively easier and cheaper to get.’”

What are your opinions?

 

Read the original article here—courtesy of Fox News

 

The Professional Medical Corp

Does it Matter What Your Doctor Looks Like?

A new study conducted by the John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the John Hopkins University School of Medicine found  out that a doctor’s body size had an influence on how he or she cared for their patients with weight problems. The researchers found that out of the 500 primary care physicians that was part of this study, 30% of normal weight physicians discussed losing weight with their patients while only 18% of the overweight doctors did.

They also found out that 93% of doctors would diagnose obesity in their patients if they believed that their own weight was equal to or less than that of their patients. The study also found that more than half of physicians were overweight or obese (53%) which is a similar percentage to the 64% of the U.S. adults that fall in the same category.

What was also surprising was that when overweight or obese doctors did discussed obesity issues with their patients, they were more likely than their normal weight physicians to prescribe anti-obesity medications (26% vs. 18%) rather than diet and exercise.

The researchers concluded that the behavior is subconscious and not intentional. This study suggest that the physical appearance of doctors can be a bigger factor to how patients are taken care of than realized.

Read the original article here—courtesy of Times Healthland.

What do you think of this study?