Spring Cleaning Safety Tips



We might all be guilty of putting off those dreaded cleaning days while we are staying nice and warm through the winter. As Spring approaches and we are getting ready to open those windows and let the breeze blow through, here are a few of our tips to keep you safe while cleaning away the winter doldrums and cobwebs!

  1. Lets clean out the clutter! Too much “stuff” can create dangerous places in the home for trips and falls. Make sure you have a clear path in every room of the house by removing unnecessary furniture or items. Think about donating or putting them in storage. Also double check edges of carpet or rungs to make sure nothing is frayed and causing trips. pexels-photo-264600.jpeg
  2.  Remember don’t move heavy things on your own! When clearing out that furniture or pile of magazines, always ask for help! Even a simple task as changing a light bulb may require some assistance if you need to stand on a chair or ladder to reach it. Think about replacing that heavy vacuum cleaner with a newer lightweight cordless model. Even something as simple as getting a extended handle for cleaning tools could help: Extended Toilet Brush
  3. Check Expiration Dates! Spring is a great time to go through the medicine cabinet and check all expiration dates. Don’t forget to check the over the counter pills as well such as Tylenol or Advil. Also a great place to look for expiration dates is your refrigerator.  Take a look at that ketchup or mayo bottle. Also remember to check your canned food in the cabinet or pantry. pexels-photo-273026.jpeg
  4. Update your emergency numbers! Double check your saved numbers in your speed dials to make sure that everyone listed has the most up to date information. Also as a tip, if you have a cell phone, be sure to add “ICE*” before your emergency contact. Emergency professionals know to look through a cell phone for ICE or In Case of Emergency contacts to reach out to them if you are unable to. Do you know who to call in an emergency? Have a list of numbers next to your phone just in case.pexels-photo-263402.jpeg
  5. Spring is the time to check those fire detector batteries! The easiest way is to just replace the batteries so they are fresh for the year. Also make sure to check your fire extinguisher and emergency kit for any expiration dates and that all supplies are full.



Top 5 tips to staying safe during Winter and Spring

With our weather fluctuating from snow to rain to sun all the while staying chilly, we want to share with you some tips to make sure you stay safe through both seasons!


    1. Ice, Snow and Rain: Driveways, sidewalks and steps can get slick and pose a serious falling hazard! To maximize safety, be sure that all pathways are shoveled, cleared or cleaned off. Even the pine needles when wet can cause us to slip and slide across the path. Be sure that you have rubber – soled shoes and new treads on your walker or cane. See walker replacements on our site: Replacement Walker Tips
    2. Avoid Falls: Try and stay inside if you can when the weather gets really rough – make arrangements for a family member or friend to shovel/salt/clean your driveways and walkways. A professional caregiver might be able to assist in everyday chores like getting the mail or picking up groceries. Take a couple of minutes each day and be sure to stretch to loosen up your muscles. Wear non-skid shoes or boots when going outside. Make sure to clean up any water or outside dirt that could track inside. Check to be sure your rubber tips on your cane or walker are not worn smooth. See our website for replacement tips: Replacement Cane Tips
    3. Dehydration: You might be especially prone to dehydration because you simply eat and drink less, thus consuming less water every day! Also people tend to feel less thirsty during the winter. A good tip to remember to drink water is set a timer for every hour and get a water bottle you can write times on. That way when the timer goes off you can drink enough to get to your next mark      waterbottlemarkedwithtime
    4. Space Heaters: While these small portable heaters can provide much needed comfort, you need to make sure that they don’t become a safety hazard instead! Be sure to get one with a timer so that its not always running. Keep it away from all flammable material such as blankets or drapes. Double check to make sure your smoke detector is working properly as well just to be safe!
    5. Disaster Kits: You always want to be prepared so make sure you have a kit in your home that will help you get through an emergency such as power outages that may last several days. Your kit should include food and water for several days (at least 3 gallons of water per person per day), a few days worth of medications (make sure they haven’t expired), a flashlight, a weather radio, extra batteries and first-aid essentials.


Tax Deadline is just around the corner.. Are you prepared?



Every year, tax season comes barreling down upon us and some of us could be unsure of what to do or how to handle it… There are a few things we want you to remember during this time


Dont1. Dont fall for the IRS phone scams! The IRS will never contact you by phone.. always by mail! They want you to call them, not the other way around. Check out their warnings here: IRS Scam Info


retirement-savings-jar 2. The more you save, you could get more credit for! Look to see how you might be able to receive an additional credit on your taxes this year: IRS Saver’s Credit Guide


to-do 3. Do you need to take a Required Minimum Distribution (RMD) from your retirement savings (IRA)? As much as we like to see the interest grow on our savings, when we reach the age of 70 1/2 years old, we cant just let the money sit there any longer! Take a look and see if you meet the requirements: IRS RMD Guide



Be sure to seek the advice of a tax professional if you cant find the answers to your questions here, IRS GUIDE, or if your special circumstances don’t fit the normal mold! Just don’t want until April 18th!




Quick Tips: Getting in Shape Without Spending Money

Get Started!

When you stay active, you feel better and have more energy for work and leisure time. You’re more able to do the things you enjoy, like playing with children, gardening, dancing, or biking.

Staying fit helps you sleep better, handle stress better, and keep your mind sharp. It’s good for your heart, lungs, bones, and joints. And it lowers your risk for heart attack, diabetes, high blood pressure, and some cancers.

And although it’s easy to spend a lot of money on sports and activities that help keep you in shape, it’s just as easy to get into shape and stay there without spending any money at all.

Remember to work on all three types of fitness: flexibility, muscle strength, and aerobic fitness.


  • Stretch all your major groups of muscles. These include the muscles of your arms, your back, your hips, the front and back of your thighs, and your calves.
  • Stretch slowly and regularly to help yourself be more flexible. Combining stretching with other fitness activities is best.
  • Warm up your muscles for 5 to 10 minutes before your stretch them.
  • Try to hold each stretch for 15 to 30 seconds.
  • Do some stretches first thing in the morning.
  • Take a “stretch break” instead of a coffee break at work.
  • Try activities that include stretching, such as dance, martial arts (aikido or karate), tai chi, or yoga.

Muscle fitness

  • Do housework and yard work on a regular basis: Scrub the bathtub, wash walls, till the garden, or pull weeds.
  • Do basic muscle-conditioning exercises such as push-ups, leg lifts, and other familiar exercises.
  • Try muscle-strengthening exercises using weights. You can use cans of food instead of buying dumbbells.

Aerobic fitness

Experts say to do either of these things:

  • Moderate activity for at least 2½ hours a week. Moderate activity means things like brisk walking, brisk cycling, or shooting baskets. But any activities—including daily chores—that raise your heart rate can be included.
  • Vigorous activity for at least 1¼ hours a week. Vigorous activity means things like jogging, cycling fast, or playing a basketball game.

These ordinary activities cost nothing and all count as aerobic activity:

  • Walking briskly to work or to do errands
  • Pushing a lawn mower
  • Vacuuming
  • Sweeping (perhaps to fast-paced music)
  • Raking leaves or shoveling snow
  • Dancing
  • Playing actively with your children
  • Walking the dog

If you need more structure for your exercise but don’t want to spend money for a class, check out exercise DVDs from the library.

Try these suggestions at work:

  • Use your morning commute to get in some extra walking. Park several blocks away, or get off the bus a few stops earlier.
  • Take the stairs instead of the elevator, at least for a few floors.
  • Suggest holding meetings with colleagues during a walk inside or outside the building.
  • Go the extra distance when possible: Get your coffee on another floor (take the stairs) or use the restroom that’s the farthest from your office.
  • Stand and do simple stretches while you make phone calls. A speakerphone may help.
  • If you need to speak to a colleague, walk to that person’s office rather than using e-mail or the phone.
  • Use your lunch hour for a workout: Take a brisk walk, jog, or bike ride. Don’t skip lunch. Eat it at your desk while you check your mail or listen to phone messages.

What are your suggestions? Comment Below!

Article Courtesy of: www.Health.com


Top 10 Medical Innovations

We are very excited to watch medical innovations come about. Cleveland Clinic is proposing the following 10 innovations to be released in 2017.. Which ones are you excited to see?




Can Vitamin C Really Cure Your Cold?

How much vitamin C do we need, and what’s the real immune-boosting potential of supplements?

Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, is a water-soluble vitamin found in many multivitamin supplements and single-entity nutritional supplements. Vitamin C has an important role in the formation of collagen, carnitine, amino acids and hormones; is an essential component in the healing of wounds and burns; and aids in the absorption of iron. Moreover, vitamin C is classified as an antioxidant, and many clinical studies report that megadoses (500 to 1000 milligrams per day) of ascorbic acid may prevent, or shorten the duration of, the common cold.

While vitamin C is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of scurvy, vitamin C is most often used by consumers to boost the immune system. Results from a 2010 analysis of 29 clinical trials with an estimated 11,000 subjects reported that taking vitamin C routinely (at least 0.2 grams day) did not decrease the likelihood of getting a cold. However, the use of vitamin C supplements was associated with a slight decrease in the severity of cold symptoms and the duration of the common cold, and some studies report a reduction of 8 percent in adults and 14 percent in children.

A review published in 2009 presenting research on the effects of vitamins and minerals for treating colds concluded that supplementation with vitamin C does have some potential benefits for treating the common cold; however, because there are only a few therapeutic trials, more research is needed to ascertain the effective dosages and the treatment guidelines. Many clinical studies suggest that vitamin C is most effective for reducing the duration of upper respiratory tract infection symptoms in children and healthy adults, but it does not appear to be as useful once a patient exhibits symptoms.

In general, vitamin C is considered safe, but adverse effects have been reported when this supplement is taken in megadoses. When ingested in megadoses of four or more grams per day, vitamin C may cause diarrhea, nausea, stomach cramps and nephrolithiasis; therefore, megadoses of the vitamin are typically not recommended. Other potential adverse effects include headache, dizziness, flushing and fatigue.

To prevent the development of kidney stones, you should drink a full glass of water when taking vitamin C. People with diabetes, a history of recurring renal calculi and/or renal dysfunction should avoid prolonged use of megadoses of vitamin C supplements. Although most individuals in the United States obtain adequate vitamin C via dietary means, the NIH reports that certain populations may be at greater risk of not obtaining sufficient recommended daily allowances.

Individuals at risk for vitamin C deficiency:

  • Smokers may need 35 milligrams per day more vitamin C because smoke can increase the amount of vitamin C that the body requires to repair damage due to free radical exposure
  • Infants who are fed with artificial formula that does not contain vitamin C
  • Individuals whose diets are low in vitamin C
  • Individuals with severe malabsorption syndrome and individuals with end-stage renal disease undergoing dialysis

Nonprescription vitamin C dietary supplements typically contain ascorbic acid, which is considered to have bioavailability equivalent to that of naturally occurring ascorbic acid in foods such as orange juice and broccoli, but some supplements contain other forms, such as sodium ascorbate, calcium ascorbate, other mineral ascorbates and ascorbic acid with bioflavonoids. Adult multivitamin supplements typically contain doses of 60 to 100 milligrams, which are considered to be adequate if supplements are required. Vitamin C is available in several dosage formulations, including capsule, tablet, lozenge, syrup, chewable tablet, effervescent tablet, oral disintegrating tablet and gummy. According to the Handbook of Nonprescription Drugs, the recommended daily limit of vitamin C is 2 grams.

Examples of nonprescription vitamin C supplements:

  • Alive Vitamin C powder
  • Emergen C
  • Ester C Vitamin C
  • Halls Defense Vitamin C Lozenges
  • Nature’s Bounty
  • Nature Made Vitamin C
  • Sunkist Vitamin C
  • Vitafusion Power C Adult Gummies

Ideally, you should obtain vitamin C through dietary means. People who choose to use supplements should take only the recommended dosage unless otherwise directed by their primary health care provider. These people should also be screened for potential drug interactions, contraindications and therapeutic duplications. For example, vitamin C supplements may interact with chemotherapeutic agents, so talk to your primary health care provider before using these supplements. Some research indicates that vitamin C supplements may also interact with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) when taken in combination with other antioxidants, such as beta carotene and vitamin E. This combination may decrease the effectiveness of statins; however, it is not known whether vitamin C alone impacts the effectiveness of this drug class.

In addition, megadoses of vitamin C may decrease the effectiveness of some agents, such as protease inhibitors, warfarin, estrogens and niacin.



Possible Healthcare Changes

Healthcare is one of the main important issues that any of us face in our day to day lives. With rising costs of prescriptions, higher monthly premiums and sky-rocketing deductibles, we all need to be informed on what changes may be coming. Be informed, stay aware, know what is happening with your healthcare!