Health Boosting Chocolates are on the Rise

So far most Americans know that dark chocolate has more health benefits than milk chocolate, but imagine chocolate with other health-boosting compounds to help prevent against heart disease, cancer and stroke. The markets for these kinds of chocolates are increasing 10% each year. It is now making annual sales of $600 million a year which is only a small percentage of the functional food industry—products marketed as having health benefits—which totals an estimated $20-30 billion a year.

Chocolatiers over the past several years have been creating different kind of chocolates that can help increase stamina, sharpen cognitive skills, and boost the immune system.  They have been doing this by adding a range of super-foods, supplements and spices to their recipes. For example, Antidote Chocolates based in New York have ingredients such as fennel to help with digestion and juniper berries to reduce water retention.

However, nutritionists say that overall dark chocolate must be dark in order to be healthy and that any chocolate containing less than 70% cacao will “offer few benefits and little functionality.” Also remember that chocolates can be full of fat, calories, and sugar so any health benefits can be offset by this. Be sure to read the ingredients and ask questions before purchasing.

Would you be ordering any of these “super” chocolates soon?

Professional Medical

Read original article here—courtesy of Times Healthland.

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Should Sugar be Regulated like Alcohol and Cigarettes?

Well, some scientists think so. Researchers from the University of California-San Francisco believe that sugar is so destructive to the public health that it should be regulated like alcohol and cigarettes.

Recently, the researchers announced that this dangerous consumption of sugar intake is contributing to the obesity pandemic and is causing many health problems such as liver damage, high blood pressure, and altering people’s hormones. They claim in their article, “The Toxic Truth about Sugar,” that this high consumption of sugar tripled worldwide in the last 50 years and is contributing to 35 million deaths.

In order to lower consumption, the researchers recommend taxation, controlling availability, and tightening requirements to sell sugary snacks and drinks in places like school and work.

However, the American Beverage Association and the Sugar Association believe that the article is without scientific merit. The Sugar Association even believes that the authors are being reckless by scaring the public with the harm and effects of sugar.

The researchers argue back that, “‘we’re not advocating a major imposition of the government into people’s lives,’” and that their ultimate goal is to “‘actually increase people’s choices by making foods that aren’t loaded with sugar comparatively easier and cheaper to get.’”

What are your opinions?

 

Read the original article here—courtesy of Fox News

 

The Professional Medical Corp

Does it Matter What Your Doctor Looks Like?

A new study conducted by the John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the John Hopkins University School of Medicine found  out that a doctor’s body size had an influence on how he or she cared for their patients with weight problems. The researchers found that out of the 500 primary care physicians that was part of this study, 30% of normal weight physicians discussed losing weight with their patients while only 18% of the overweight doctors did.

They also found out that 93% of doctors would diagnose obesity in their patients if they believed that their own weight was equal to or less than that of their patients. The study also found that more than half of physicians were overweight or obese (53%) which is a similar percentage to the 64% of the U.S. adults that fall in the same category.

What was also surprising was that when overweight or obese doctors did discussed obesity issues with their patients, they were more likely than their normal weight physicians to prescribe anti-obesity medications (26% vs. 18%) rather than diet and exercise.

The researchers concluded that the behavior is subconscious and not intentional. This study suggest that the physical appearance of doctors can be a bigger factor to how patients are taken care of than realized.

Read the original article here—courtesy of Times Healthland.

What do you think of this study?

Greek Yogurt vs. Regular Yogurt

AARP.com wrote a good article that summarized the difference between Greek and regular yogurt. Below are just some of the highlights:

Protein: Greek yogurt wins by having nearly twice the protein.

Sodium: Greek has half the salt.

Calcium: If you’re looking for more calcium, regular yogurt is the way to go. It has about three times as much calcium.

Calories: It is about the same if you are comparing similar flavors and fat levels.

Carbohydrates: It depends. Greek plain yogurt has half the sugar than the regular.

Fat: It also depends. Full-fat Greek yogurt has three times the fat of regular, full-fat yogurt. However, there is nonfat or low-fat Greek yogurt as a buying option.

Greek yogurt is usually pricier than regular yogurt, because it takes about three times as much milk to produce a pound of Greek yogurt compared to the regular kind. The reason behind this is the process—for that Greek yogurt taste, it would need to be strained to remove most of the liquid whey to give it that thicker consistency it is known for.

For more info and the original article click here—courtesy of AARP.com

So which one do you usually like better?

-Professional Medical Corp.

Overall, Cancer Rates in U.S. Continue to Decline

The American Cancer Society’s annual report announced that cancer death rates are declining 1.8 percent per year in men and 1.6 percent per year in women between 2004 and 2008.  The advances in cancer screening and treatment have prevented a million + deaths from cancer since the early 1990’s. There were seven less-common cancers that rose in the past decade signifying that more can be done.

Also, between 1999 and 2008, cancer death rates fell by more than 1 percent each year in both men and women in every racial and ethnic group except for American Indians/Natives whose rates are holding steady.

The biggest declines were among black men (2.4 percent) and Hispanic men (2.3 percent).

This year, they suggest that 1,638,910 people will be newly diagnosed with cancer and 577,190 people will die from it. That is why it is important to do cancer screenings every year.

For more statistics and information, click here—Courtesy of Foxnews.com

What do you think of this news?

Drugs that are Becoming Generic this Year

AARP.com announced some of many brand-name prescription medications that are going generic  for 2012. Last year, brands such as Lipitor and Zyprexa went generic, giving people cheaper alternatives. Look below for this year’s list.

  1. Lexapro—use to treat depression  (March)
  2. Provigil—used to treat sleep problems (April)
  3. Plavix—an antiplatelet drug used to prevent blood clots (May)
  4. Singulair—an Asthma drug (August)

This is great news for those who want more affordable drugs.

Click here for the original article—courtesy of AARP.com

Is Weight Gain and Relationship With Mom Related?

A new study that was published in Pediatrics followed 977 children born in 1991 and enrolled in the Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. The results found that toddlers who had a poor emotional bond with their mothers were twice as likely to become obese by age 15 compared to those who had “healthy” relationships. This concluded that the less secure the children’s early bond is with their mother, the greater chance of obesity.

The researchers suggest that there might be a relationship between teen obesity and early childhood experience which originated in the brain, in locations where regulated hormones influence emotion and stress response along with appetite, sleep-wake cycle, and other metabolic functions.

What do you think of this study?

Click here for the original article—courtesy of Times Heathland