Do You Want to Learn More About Caregiving?

Giving

Challenges in Caregiving: Giving Care, Taking Care, a caregiver training conference will be offered on Monday, June 3, 2013 at the Tukwila Community Center in Tukwila, Washington. The event is hosted by Aging and Disability Services Administration, Full Life Care and Pierce County Community Connections/Aging and Long Term Care along with the support of numerous community organizations. The conference is designed to provide current, practical skills and resources that community caregivers can use in their daily caregiving responsibilities. The conference is intended for:

• Family caregivers (spouses, adult children, parents of adults with disabilities, or other relatives)
• Home care workers and adult day services staff
• Adult family home or assisted living staff
• Social service or mental health professionals who work with family caregivers

The Early Registration fee (by May 15) for individual caregivers is $30. Scholarships are available for unpaid family caregivers. The Early Registration fee for agency-based caregivers is $50. Fees include workshops, lunch and resource exhibits. Registration forms will be available in April and space is limited – so don’t delay! For more information or to receive a full brochure and registration materials, please call 1-800-422-3263 or 360-725-2544.

~Professional Medical Corp.

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Tips to Reduce Bathroom Trips

Seven is the average trips a person should take to the bathroom a day. There is such a thing as going to the bathroom too much or too little. “Holding in” your bladder can stretch out your bladder making it harder to empty it out completely.

Here are some tips to reduce your bathroom trips

  1. Watch your liquid intake- Always drink when thirsty, but limit your intake to about 70 ounces a day. Drinking 10 – 12 glasses a day maybe too much.
  2. Log your bathroom trips – For two to three days, keep track of how many times you want to go the bathroom. This should be one of the first steps in bladder training and should give you a baseline as you work on reducing your trips.
  3. Increase your time between trips – Your goal is to go the bathroom every 3 hours. Every week, gradually increase your time until you get to your goal level. Be patient, it may take up to three months to reach your goal.
  4. Get support— While you are training, getting support from a professional can really help. Your physician can refer you to continence nurse practitioner or a physical therapist that can help.

Want more tips and ideas? Click here! – Courtesy of Health.com

Can Weight Loss Help Incontinence?

 

If you’re among the millions of women who suffer from urinary incontinence, losing weight might just ease your symptoms, a new study suggests.

Published in the Jan. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, the study found that when women lost about 8 percent of their body weight — an average of 17 pounds for this group — the frequency of incontinence episodes dropped by almost half.

“Weight is one of the biggest risk factors for developing incontinence and for worsening incontinence,” said study author Dr. Leslee Subak, an associate professor in the departments of obstetrics, gynecology, reproductive sciences, urology and epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of California, San Francisco.

More than 13 million American women have urinary incontinence problems, according to background information in the study. Observational studies have found an association between extra weight and incontinence, and other research has suggested that losing weight might be beneficial for relieving incontinence symptoms.

To confirm these findings, Subak and her colleagues recruited 338 women from Rhode Island and Alabama. The women had to be at least 30, with a body-mass index (BMI) between 25 and 50. A BMI over 25 is considered overweight and over 30 is obese, according to the National Institutes of Health. All of the women experienced at least 10 incontinence episodes in a seven-day period.

Two-thirds of the women were randomly assigned to the intervention group, which included diet, exercise and behavior modification, while the remaining one-third (the control group) received four educational sessions about weight loss, healthful eating and physical activity. All of the women received a self-help booklet with tips for improving their urinary incontinence.

The intervention group met for one hour every week for six months and were put on a structured protocol, including diet and exercise, designed to help them lose between 7 percent and 9 percent of their starting weight.

On average, the intervention group lost 8 percent of their body weight, or about 17 pounds each. The control group lost 1.6 percent of their body weight, or a little more than 3 pounds each.

After six months, the weekly number of incontinence episodes dropped by 47 percent for those in the intervention group compared to 28 percent in the control group. The intervention group also reported fewer episodes of stress incontinence — that’s incontinence that occurs due to extra pressure from laughing, coughing or sneezing. This group did not see improvement in urge incontinence — that’s the feeling of a sudden need to urinate.

“The reduced pressure from weight loss causes reduced pressure on the bladder,” Subak explained.

She said these findings confirm that weight loss can be considered a first-line treatment for women with incontinence.

“The weight we carry around affects our bodies in so many different ways,” said Dr. Janet Tomezsko, chief of the section of urogynecology at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. “And, the more overweight you are, the more you have to lose to make an impact, but you can make an impact. It’s not an easy thing to do, but I think we’re going to see more and more programs that address weight loss, exercise and pelvic health.”

Article courtesy of Serena Gordon.

Collagen Injections to Relieve Incontinence in Women

Collagen injections can benefit women who still suffer from stress urinary incontinence even after urethral or periurethral surgery, a UT Southwestern Medical Center researcher has found.

“Patients with persistent or recurrent incontinence often do not wish to undergo another surgery,” said Dr. Philippe Zimmern, professor of urology and the study’s lead author. “The collagen injection is also a good alternative for those who cannot afford recovery time from surgery or are too medically unfit or frail to undergo a second surgical intervention.”

The prevalence of SUI is higher in women than men. While not life threatening, the condition can socially cripple those afflicted because of its embarrassing nature. Despite surgical advancements for treatment, existing procedures sometimes fail. Collagen has been used to treat SUI because its injection into the tissue surrounding the urethra tightens the urethral sphincter and stops urine from leaking.

Read more

Source: iHealth Bulletin News

Disposable Underpads

Disposable Underpads are designed to protect beds, chairs, wheelchairs, and other furniture surfaces from exposure to unwanted moisture.
They’re great as an extra layer for overnight protection for bed linens or use in the car. But these pads don’t only well for older adults and young children- they are a great alternative to those expensive puppy training pads at the pet store!