Health Boosting Chocolates are on the Rise

So far most Americans know that dark chocolate has more health benefits than milk chocolate, but imagine chocolate with other health-boosting compounds to help prevent against heart disease, cancer and stroke. The markets for these kinds of chocolates are increasing 10% each year. It is now making annual sales of $600 million a year which is only a small percentage of the functional food industry—products marketed as having health benefits—which totals an estimated $20-30 billion a year.

Chocolatiers over the past several years have been creating different kind of chocolates that can help increase stamina, sharpen cognitive skills, and boost the immune system.  They have been doing this by adding a range of super-foods, supplements and spices to their recipes. For example, Antidote Chocolates based in New York have ingredients such as fennel to help with digestion and juniper berries to reduce water retention.

However, nutritionists say that overall dark chocolate must be dark in order to be healthy and that any chocolate containing less than 70% cacao will “offer few benefits and little functionality.” Also remember that chocolates can be full of fat, calories, and sugar so any health benefits can be offset by this. Be sure to read the ingredients and ask questions before purchasing.

Would you be ordering any of these “super” chocolates soon?

Professional Medical

Read original article here—courtesy of Times Healthland.

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Another Benefit of Chocolate for Women

A new study from Sweden claims that the more chocolate women eat, the lower their stroke risk. This could be added to list of benefits from eating chocolate such as lower blood pressure and reduced heart risk. The article says, “For every 50-gram (1.8 oz.) increase in chocolate consumption per week, the participants’ overall stroke risk dropped 14%.” It drops even further the more chocolate consumption. It also varied between different kinds of stroke, for example, the chocolate intake can be related to a 27% drop in hemorrhagic stroke risk, but on the other hand there was only 12% lower risk of strokes caused by clots.

The 10 year old study followed 33,373 women, aged 49-83, and asked them to fill out extensive questionnaires about their diet and lifestyle. The study also emphasized that women shouldn’t start eating loads of chocolate, and should still consider eating them in moderation. Also, dark chocolate is better than milk chocolate. 90% of the time, the women in this study were eating Swedish chocolate which has a higher concentration of cocoa than in the U.S.

What do you think of this study?

Read original article here—Courtesy of Times Health Land

Lightened Chocolate Desserts

You don’t have to stay away from chocolate when you’re on a diet. Cookinglight.com listed 20 mouth watering chocolate recipes that are more health conscious. Now, who doesn’t like chocolate? Below is one of our favorite recipes for individual chocolate soufflés, 152 calories each.

Ingredients
  • Cooking spray
  • 4 1/2 tablespoons granulated sugar, divided
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons Dutch process cocoa
  • 2 tablespoons fat-free milk
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 large egg white
  • 1 teaspoon powdered sugar

Directions

  1. Preheat oven 350º
  2. Grab two ramekins (6-ounce) and coat them with cooking spray and sprinkle each ramekin with 3/4 teaspoon granulated sugar.
  3. Mix 2 tablespoons granulated sugar, flour, cocoa, and milk in a small saucepan over medium heat. Cook 2 minutes while stirring until smooth. Spoon chocolate mixture into a medium bowl and then cool 4 minutes. Next, stir in vanilla.
  4. Place egg white in a medium bowl; beat with a mixer at high speed until soft peaks form.
  5. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons granulated sugar, 1 teaspoon at a time, beating until stiff peaks form (do not overbeat).
  6. Gently stir 1/4 of egg white mixture into chocolate mixture; gently fold in remaining egg white mixture. Spoon mixture into prepared dishes.
  7. Sharply tap dishes 2 or 3 times to level.
  8.  Place dishes on a baking sheet; bake at 350° for 15 minutes or until puffy and set.
  9. Sprinkle each soufflé with 1/2 teaspoon powdered sugar. Serve immediately.

Click here for the nutrition information for this recipe!

Click here for the other lightened chocolate recipes!

Recipe courtesy of cookinglight.com

Image by: Randy Mayor